Festive Countdown 2016- Week Two!

Books 5-8 in our festive countdown are below; this week there’s an (entirely unintentional!) animal theme, four brilliant books we think are definitely worth exploring. If you missed week one, you can find it here and don’t forget: if you see anything that takes your fancy, you can pop along to your local library OR borrow them directly from us- just get in touch!

advent-week-2

  • D is for Duck! by David Melling

There are only about 26 words in this delightful picture book – one for each letter of the alphabet, and so the reader has to fill the gaps by studying the bright cartoony pictures and deducing the story. A cheeky looking duck magician creates animals and mayhem with his wand, with a final amusing twist. Even the endpapers tell a fun wordless story. This will be brilliant for lots of discussion with a child.

(Hachette Children’s Group, £6.99 paperback, ISBN 9781444931105, find it at a Norfolk Library)

  • Our Very Own Dog by Amanda McCardie, illustrated by Salvatore Rubbino

A lovely picture book introduction to owning a dog, and the responsibilities that come with training and looking after a pet, as well as the pleasures. The simple text is in the form of a story, with smaller print captions giving factual information. The pictures by award-winning Rubbino are a delight.

(Walker Books, £11.99 hardback, ISBN 9781406356205)

  • Leaping Lemmings! By John Briggs, illustrated by Nicola Slater

We all know that lemmings have an even worse reputation than sheep at all doing the same thing – whatever the outcome – but this hilarious picture book is about one lemming who refuses to follow the pack, and who becomes a hero when he manages to stop his fellow lemmings from leaping off a cliff. A celebration of thinking for yourself and not minding being different.

(Sterling Publishing, £12.99 hardback, ISBN 9781454918196)

  • A First Book of Animals by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Petr Horacek

The prosaic title reveals nothing of the glorious vivid paintings and drawings which illuminate this book about a wide range of animals. The text is in the form, mostly, of poems, and while not rivalling – for example – Blake’s Tyger Tyger, they are surprisingly informative and complement the illustrations nicely.

(Walker Books, £14.99 hardback, ISBN 9781406359633)

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